1. Mastering events to reach audiences: ONA learnings, part 2

    At Juice, we’ve increased our number of events considerably in the last year. From a larger Juice YP of the Year program to our partnership with YPC, the Charity Challenge and the Mixies music awards and the Halloween Costume Contest, we’re out there a lot.

    But the events-focused session at ONA with Chad Graham, Brenda Williams-Butts and Olivia Allen-Price changed my mindset on approaches and helping define success. Here are some of my key takeaways:

    PLANNING AN EVENT:

    Define audience goals first: Is it a retention/loyalty event? Or audience acquisition?

    Next: Determine how you’ll reach that audience, and then how to feature our content.

    Have a budget from the beginning that you’re always going back to, grow it from there.

    Go for a smaller room. It’ll look more lively in photos, and the energy of people being in closer proximity is better.

    Set goals like number of new email addresses (which helps define audience). Make sure it’s opt-in.

    BEFORE AN EVENT:

    Ticketing is good for several things: It makes people feel like they have skin in the game to show up, rather than just RSVPing, It also can help keep track and define the audience that shows up — is it new? loyal? Where are they from? Just $5 works.

    Online ticketing services will also give you opportunities to communicate in advance: ideas shared to do an FAQ two weeks in advance, reminder the week of the event.

    For volunteers: Communicate specific expectations.

    Make it easy: Figure out things like parking, overcommunicate directions.

    Find a partner with resources to set up, break down. Always do a dry run at the event, particularly A/V, Graham said.

    DURING AN EVENT:

    Williams-Butts said she pays influencers a nominal amount to tweet from an event.

    Content ideas: Stream and archive, collect stories, do live coverage, share behind-the-scenes

    Know that something will go wrong. That’s OK. Graham mentioned one time during a morning meeting when a snafu meant no coffee. When someone asked where the coffee was, the attendee was given a $5 card and directions to the Starbucks a couple blocks away.

    AFTER AN EVENT:

    Events should be continuously refined, just like anything else we do. What swag works best? Did you reach intended audience?

    It’s all about engaging audiences in a way that’s authentic and deeper than our usual interactions of social media or content delivery.

  2. How we as journalists can be better at communicating:

    This morning, Josh Hafner and I hosted a group of young professional women at the Des Moines Register community room.

    We had coffee, talked about the challenges and opportunities for YP women, and had a roundtable discussion on how we can be more reflective of and address the needs of our community.

    The last question I asked: How do we fall short? What are we not good at covering or doing?

    A couple of the responses that apply across beats:

    Being stuck in our roles versus being helpful.

    Being responsive — getting any response. I know I’ve been guilty of this in the past — tabling an e-mail or passing it along without responding in a timely manner.

    Giving guidance: The woman who mentioned this also gave some good tips for the type of feedback that would be helpful: Explaining our current coverage and what we’re looking for, explaining our focus, connecting others in the newsroom who might be interested in a response. I’d also add: what we know people are interested in.

    What else is good to include on better communicating?

  3. "If you’re not solving a problem then you’re creating one."

    -Eric Reiss is the CEO and Content Strategist at The FatDUX Group; How to check if your app is addictive enough to make money

    via American Press Institute

  4. theatlantic:

Twitter Marks Philadelphia City Paper as Spam, Breaks All Links to the Site

With an election looming in less than a week, journalists are being pressed into holding off on publishing their work, for fear that they won’t be able to serve it to readers.
Read more. [Image: Twitter]


"It had never really hit home for me before that we all depend on these external social media entities, controlled by private companies, to provide a service that is now integral to publishing news online."Thought-provoking piece on a news org that’s been marked as spam by Twitter.

    theatlantic:

    Twitter Marks Philadelphia City Paper as Spam, Breaks All Links to the Site

    With an election looming in less than a week, journalists are being pressed into holding off on publishing their work, for fear that they won’t be able to serve it to readers.

    Read more. [Image: Twitter]

    "It had never really hit home for me before that we all depend on these external social media entities, controlled by private companies, to provide a service that is now integral to publishing news online."

    Thought-provoking piece on a news org that’s been marked as spam by Twitter.

  5. A friendly reminder for video training. Vertical video is bad.

  6. How to be viral: Getting readers to click and share your stuff

    (via boingboing)

    THIS is amazing. Great tips on writing shareable headlines, what images and content should be showing up when readers want to share this content.

    Really interesting point about the ‘curiousity gap’ — too specific, don’t need to click. Something that still stokes curiosity — the sweet spot. Click through the whole thing. It’s worth it.

  7. It seems like just a couple of months ago, ‘augmented reality’ was nothing but a TED talk. Now that we’ve put out the Augmented Reality Issue (and plan to continue augmented reality features for the forseeable future), I count this as the issue I’m most proud of this year.

You can view the augmented reality by downloading the apps: dmreg.co/LifeInActioniOS or dmreg.co/LifeInActionAndroid and using them on this PDF viewer on your screen.

    It seems like just a couple of months ago, ‘augmented reality’ was nothing but a TED talk. Now that we’ve put out the Augmented Reality Issue (and plan to continue augmented reality features for the forseeable future), I count this as the issue I’m most proud of this year.

    You can view the augmented reality by downloading the apps: dmreg.co/LifeInActioniOS or dmreg.co/LifeInActionAndroid and using them on this PDF viewer on your screen.

  8. election night in Iowa, in Instagram, by Juice staff.

    election night in Iowa, in Instagram, by Juice staff.

About me

Hi. I'm Sarah Day Owen. Here you'll find my essential reading list for the future of media, plus some of my work.

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